Water for fauna

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Water for fauna

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    Helping fish thrive through the wet and the dry

    Author: Dr Matthew Coleman, MDBA General Manager Science and Evaluation This year, helping to sustain native fish populations will be a priority for water planners and environmental water holders. The Murray–Darling Basin Authority (MDBA) has released its recommendations on how water for the environment should be used so that it best meets the needs of […]

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    Flows through our land

    Natasha Childs links us with the network of waterways connecting people and animals in our landscapes. Not too far from where we are, a patchwork of forests, farms and towns stretches out across the landscape. Bush tracks connect country kids with school bus routes. Rail lines carry world-class food and fibre to market. Freeways bring […]

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    Supporting river systems: why cross-border watering works

    Natasha Childs explains the system-wide approach being taken to look after this network of rivers. The Southern Connected Basin is a network of rivers that feed into the Murray River between the Hume Dam and the sea. The network includes Victoria’s Goulburn, Campaspe and Loddon rivers, along with the Murrumbidgee, Edward-Wakool, Darling Rivers and, occasionally, […]

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    See the 'Top Six Wetland Wonders' of inland NSW

    No time for a road trip? Still craving the great outdoors?
    Then sit back and enjoy our Top Six Wetland Wonders as recommended by people on the ground who are working to restore and protect the rivers and wetlands of inland New South Wales.

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    Victorian Volcanic Plain Stewardship Program

    Private landholders across the VVP within the Glenelg Hopkins region will share National Landcare Program funding to undertake a range of activities that will assist in protecting biodiversity while maintaining productive farming practices. Activities include fencing grasslands and wetlands to improve grazing management, weed control, photo point monitoring, pest plant and animal control and monitoring and mosaic burning.

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    Water at work…

    From their cool, quiet hiding places on the banks of Speewa Creek, three frog species have emerged after environmental water revived their wetland habitat. An environmental flow of 500 megalitres was delivered to the creek, north of Swan Hill, in June 2014.

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    The sound of success

    The endangered Southern Bell Frog has returned to the Lachlan River following environmental flows in 2013. Researchers were excited to discover they had returned, following careful and well-planned use of environmental water.