Vegetation

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Particular species require tailored management strategies to promote growth and create conditions in which they can thrive.

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    Norman's Lagoon, East Albury

    Close to the heart of Albury, Norman’s Lagoon is a billabong on the Murray River floodplain which once contained clear water, high-quality diverse aquatic vegetation and significant native fish populations. The 2001-2009 drought caused a decline in the health of the Lagoon, however, a recent partnership between AlburyCity and Murray LLS has focused attention on the wetland’s restoration, a major priority for biodiversity conservation in the Albury area.

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    More wet equals more green in the marshes

    In 1991 a group of botanists headed out beyond the Great Divide to map the vegetation of the Macquarie Marshes for the very first time. The project would lay a foundation for several repeat surveys, the latest of which took place earlier this year.

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    Looking after our internationally recognised wetlands and forests

    The Murray LLS has provided Australian Government funds to local landholders and a number of Aboriginal groups to carry out weed and pest control works in and around the Werai, Millewa and Koondrook-Perricoota Central Murray Ramsar wetland sites. Ramsar listed sites are recognised under an international agreement for their ecological value. The works include feral pig trapping, fox baiting and woody weed and aquatic weed control.

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    Wirraminna

    Norman’s Lagoon (located near Doctors Point in Albury, NSW) is a long and narrow billabong on the Murray River floodplain with a circumference of nearly 4 km and covering roughly 13 hectares. It contains a diverse range of aquatic micro-habitats. It contained clear water, high-quality diverse aquatic vegetation and significant native fish populations prior to […]

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    Wonga Wetlands

    Norman’s Lagoon (located near Doctors Point in Albury, NSW) is a long and narrow billabong on the Murray River floodplain with a circumference of nearly 4 km and covering roughly 13 hectares. It contains a diverse range of aquatic micro-habitats. It contained clear water, high-quality diverse aquatic vegetation and significant native fish populations prior to […]

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    Window on the Wetlands Centre, Warren

    Norman’s Lagoon (located near Doctors Point in Albury, NSW) is a long and narrow billabong on the Murray River floodplain with a circumference of nearly 4 km and covering roughly 13 hectares. It contains a diverse range of aquatic micro-habitats. It contained clear water, high-quality diverse aquatic vegetation and significant native fish populations prior to […]

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    Working together for wetlands

    Landholders have joined forces with the Office of Environment and Heritage to revive long-stranded wetlands in the Murrumbidgee valley. The ongoing efforts of OEH staff and property owners has triggered the return of thousands of waterbirds including several threatened species. And the story continues . .

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    Improving Connectivity of Flows in the Lower Ovens Floodplain

    Norman’s Lagoon (located near Doctors Point in Albury, NSW) is a long and narrow billabong on the Murray River floodplain with a circumference of nearly 4 km and covering roughly 13 hectares. It contains a diverse range of aquatic micro-habitats. It contained clear water, high-quality diverse aquatic vegetation and significant native fish populations prior to […]

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    Glenelg River Restoration Project

    Over fourteen years the Project has worked with over 659 individual landholders, community groups and government agencies to help construct 1725km of fencing, planted more than half a million trees and direct seeded 796km of waterway frontage. The restoration program has also completed 2784ha of weed control, re-instated 870 pieces of large wood, opened 977km of the Glenelg river and its tributaries to fish movement and established and delivered an environmental flows entitlement.