River research and management

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The latest theory and practice of integrated catchment management research and monitoring is shared here.

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    Understanding the effectiveness of riparian management interventions

    Murray Local Land Services (Murray LLS) has a long history of managing waterways and riparian zones to ensure these ecosystems remain healthy and productive for future generations.  Regular monitoring is used  to determine the effectiveness of management actions, however, often responses vary over time and at different locations. In response to this variability, Murray LLS has developed […]

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    Murray Darling Wetlands in good hands

      Wetlands within the Murray Darling Basin are in good hands, with over 20 years of work by the Murray Darling Wetlands Working Group (MDWWG) to restore and improve the management of wetlands throughout the catchment. Murray Darling Wetlands Working Group (MDWWG) Ltd. (and its predecessor NSW Murray Wetlands Working Group Inc.) has a long history of […]

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    A Clearer Passage for the Pumicestone

    Sunshine Coast Council is committed to maintaining healthy waterways; Council’s vision is to be ‘Australia’s most sustainable region – vibrant, green, diverse’. Recently, a catchment and estuary action plan for the Pumicestone Passage and its Catchment has been completed, which was initiated by the Sunshine Coast Waterways and Coastal Management Strategy 2011-2021. This action plan is part of Councils strategy to develop and implement tailored river catchment action plans and was the first one completed.

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    Improving Connectivity of Flows in the Lower Ovens Floodplain

    Many of the floodplains and wetlands within the Murray-Darling Basin have been subject to anthropogenic changes that have negatively affected the condition of these environmental assets. The lower Ovens River and its floodplain wetlands are in much better condition than many other rivers in the basin due to the absence of major water storages and […]

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    Glenelg River Restoration Project

    Over fourteen years the Project has worked with over 659 individual landholders, community groups and government agencies to help construct 1725km of fencing, planted more than half a million trees and direct seeded 796km of waterway frontage. The restoration program has also completed 2784ha of weed control, re-instated 870 pieces of large wood, opened 977km of the Glenelg river and its tributaries to fish movement and established and delivered an environmental flows entitlement.

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    Dewfish Demonstration Reach

    The Dewfish Demonstration Reach is Queensland’s first Native Fish Strategy (www.finterest.com.au) Demonstration reach. It was established to demonstrate and promote what can be done to achieve a healthy river system for native fish and the greater river catchment. The reach is managed by a dedicated team at the Condamine Alliance (www.condaminealliance.com.au), who strive to achieve positive outcomes for native fish whilst engaging the community in their river.

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    Rivers of Carbon - Southern Tablelands Riparian Linkages Project

    ‘Rivers of Carbon’ is an exciting new initiative working in partnership with landholders, the Lachlan Catchment Management Authority, Murrumbidgee Catchment Management Authority, and other organisations in the Southern Tablelands to link native vegetation and previously rehabilitated sites to form intact riparian corridors – creating ‘rivers of carbon’.

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    Murray Wetland Carbon Storage project

    Extensive vegetation clearing and altered land management have caused a reduction in the extent and diversity of carbon stores across Australia. Wetlands represent a major potential carbon sink with high levels of productivity and integral incorporation of carbon into sediments, as well as contributing to biodiversity within the landscape.

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    Bottle Bend Lagoon Restoration

    Bottle Bend in New South Wales has become an “icon site” but is famous for all the wrong reasons. A bright orange, muddy depression surrounded by ghost white trees with no leaves – the smell of rotten egg gas. What went wrong? Acid sulfate soils buried beneath the wetland became exposed to the air during the prolonged drought, resulting in acidic water and the death of fish, trees and plants.

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    Environmental watering of Fletchers Creek: the value of project partnerships

    Fletchers Creek is an ephemeral creek, that when flows, empties into Fletchers Lake and is located about 7 km north-west of Dareton, in western New South Wales.
    The Murray Darling Wetlands Working Group Ltd. and the Barkindji Maraura Elders Environment Team have entered into a partnership project to deliver and monitor environmental water to Fletchers Creek.