Managing Livestock

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Ways to manage stock so vulnerable riparian areas can be used at critical times yet protected from harmful grazing stock trampling banks and polluting water.
  • Fencing and watering

    Practical information about how to fence and water stock but keep them away from vulnerable riverine areas is found in this part of the site.
  • Grazing regimes

    Riverine areas can be integrated into grazing regimes by becoming 'living haystacks' when other parts of the farm have dried out. Different approaches are used depending on the enterprise and environment.

Showing 10 from 11 Items
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    Fiery Creek Restoration Project

    The Fiery Creek Restoration Project is protecting and restoring the upper reaches of Fiery Creek which contain some of the best examples of remnant riparian vegetation and physical habitat in the Upper Hopkins Basin.

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    Budj Bim Restoration Project

    The Budj Bim National Heritage Landscape is a section of volcanic plain that encompasses the area from Mt Eccles to the sea. The basalt lava flow created a series of wetlands and rivers including Lake Condah, Darlots Creek and Fitzroy River and estuary. In 2010, Lake Condah was restored and the Gunditj Mirring Traditional Owners are now focusing on protecting and restoring other waterways in the landscape.

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    Victorian Volcanic Plain Stewardship Program

    Private landholders across the VVP within the Glenelg Hopkins region will share National Landcare Program funding to undertake a range of activities that will assist in protecting biodiversity while maintaining productive farming practices. Activities include fencing grasslands and wetlands to improve grazing management, weed control, photo point monitoring, pest plant and animal control and monitoring and mosaic burning.

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    NRM North - Riverbank Erosion Grants 2015

    Established in 2008, NRM North’s Tamar Estuary and Esk Rivers (TEER) Program is a regional partnership between the statutory agencies responsible for waterway management within the Tamar Estuary and Esk River catchments. The TEER area covers approximately 15% of Tasmania and includes the Tamar, North Esk, South Esk, Macquarie, Brumby-Lake and Meander River catchments. In […]

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    Macquarie River NatureLinks

    The Macquarie River ‘NatureLinks’ program has been running since 2009 and aims to connect high conservation value riparian remnants and aquatic habitats through protection and improved management, restoration of degraded areas, and actions to help species migrations or life-history movement patterns. The focus of the NatureLinks program is the area from Macquarie Marshes to Burrendong Dam, […]

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    Biodiversity conservation in the Top End: pastoralists perspectives

    New research is underway to better understand how pastoralists and graziers could complement the national reserve system through voluntary contractual biodiversity conservation activities. Very little of Australia’s tropical savannas, which cover around a quarter of the continent, are protected in the formal reserve system. Contributions by the pastoral sector are critical to safeguard endemic species, […]

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    Glenelg River Restoration Project

    Over fourteen years the Project has worked with over 659 individual landholders, community groups and government agencies to help construct 1725km of fencing, planted more than half a million trees and direct seeded 796km of waterway frontage. The restoration program has also completed 2784ha of weed control, re-instated 870 pieces of large wood, opened 977km of the Glenelg river and its tributaries to fish movement and established and delivered an environmental flows entitlement.

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    Buffalo Brook

    When Biz and Lindsay Nicolson began running ‘Bonneys Plains’ in 1988, the banks of Buffalo Brook were severely eroded, there was little or no riparian vegetation, water quality was poor and there was no sign of aquatic life. Today, fencing off the stream would seem the obvious solution to the degradation. In 1986, however, the decision to exclude stock was contrary to the prevailing management practice which relied on direct waterway access for all paddocks. This project tells the story of what has happened in the 25 years since the fence went up along Buffalo Brook.