Environmental Watering

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These projects are managing allocations of water to achieve environmental and ecological outcomes in wetlands, rivers and underground.

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    Conserving Crucial Corridors

    Paula D’Santos, Clayton Sharpe, Iain Ellis, Irene Wegner and Adam Sluggett fill in the details of flows being provided for native fish in the Lower Darling. Native fish populations across the Murray-Darling Basin have been adversely effected by river regulation, water extraction and associated habitat loss. Environmental water is increasingly being used to supplement and […]

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    Clever Ways with Water

    Paula D’Santos, Clayton Sharpe, Iain Ellis, Irene Wegner and Adam Sluggett fill in the details of flows being provided for native fish in the Lower Darling. Native fish populations across the Murray-Darling Basin have been adversely effected by river regulation, water extraction and associated habitat loss. Environmental water is increasingly being used to supplement and […]

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    Fine dining from waterways

    Paula D’Santos, Clayton Sharpe, Iain Ellis, Irene Wegner and Adam Sluggett fill in the details of flows being provided for native fish in the Lower Darling. Native fish populations across the Murray-Darling Basin have been adversely effected by river regulation, water extraction and associated habitat loss. Environmental water is increasingly being used to supplement and […]

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    Sky's the limit for conservation volunteer

    The work of a young bird-watching enthusiast has been recognised at the 2016 NSW Northern Regional Volunteer of the Year Awards. Curtis Hayne from Moree has been awarded the NSW Regional Student Volunteer of the Year for his work in bird conservation.

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    Bottle Bend bouncing back

    Habitat is bouncing back to health at Bottle Bend thanks to the latest watering event. Native plants, birds and frogs are making the most of the conditions.

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    Bush birds respond to environmental water in Murray

    There’s fresh hope for woodland bird populations thanks to environmental water. The latest research, focusing on wetlands in southern NSW, shows that woodland birds are responding to environmental water by feeding and – most importantly – breeding in nearby bushland.

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    Follow that frog - in the Lachlan valley

    When the creeks run dry and the temperature rises, where do all the frogs go?

    Amphibians are among the first animals to respond when water arrives in a wetland. Their croaking chorus creates a din that can be heard kilometres away. But how do inland frogs survive Australia’s hot dry summers when running water can all but disappear?

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    Science in action - monitoring the Gwydir River system

    Science played an important role in re-starting the Gwydir and Mehi rivers after a dry spell. In the Gwydir valley, the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage helped to protect native fish and gently restore flows to local waterways.

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    Working together to support native fish

    The science behind water management is helping to provide healthy habitat capable of sustaining native fish throughout their lifetime. Environmental water is a key component of this process with promising outcomes in Murrumbidgee rivers and wetlands.

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    Keeping watch over a wandering wetland

    It’s big. It’s complex. And it’s on the move. But don’t be alarmed. Scientists are keeping a close eye on this wandering giant. The Macquarie Marshes have a long history of change, and scientists are helping to tell the story.