Biodiversity

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River and wetland projects focusing on creating and maintaining healthy river and wetland ecosystems for fish waterbirds and other species.
  • Frogs and other fauna

    Particular species require tailored management strategies to promote breeding and create conditions in which they can thrive.
  • Native and Introduced fish

    Strategies for protecting and rejuvenating native fish species as well as managing introduced pest fish species.
  • Vegetation

    Particular species require tailored management strategies to promote growth and create conditions in which they can thrive.
  • Waterbirds

    Particular species require tailored management strategies to promote breeding and create conditions in which they can thrive.

Showing 10 from 79 Items
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    Maccas on the move: spawning success in the Murrumbidgee

    We are so fortunate to have high calibre researchers like Prue McGuffie working along our River of Carbon – Upper Bidgee River reach. Prue is a Macquarie Perch specialist, and over the last few months has been paddling up and down the Upper Murrumbidgee to gain a greater understanding about this special fish. Prue’s work […]

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    Lachlan River Catchment History

    We are so fortunate to have high calibre researchers like Prue McGuffie working along our River of Carbon – Upper Bidgee River reach. Prue is a Macquarie Perch specialist, and over the last few months has been paddling up and down the Upper Murrumbidgee to gain a greater understanding about this special fish. Prue’s work […]

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    Bottle Bend bouncing back

    Habitat is bouncing back to health at Bottle Bend thanks to the latest watering event. Native plants, birds and frogs are making the most of the conditions.

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    Bush birds respond to environmental water in Murray

    There’s fresh hope for woodland bird populations thanks to environmental water. The latest research, focusing on wetlands in southern NSW, shows that woodland birds are responding to environmental water by feeding and – most importantly – breeding in nearby bushland.

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    Follow that frog - in the Lachlan valley

    When the creeks run dry and the temperature rises, where do all the frogs go?

    Amphibians are among the first animals to respond when water arrives in a wetland. Their croaking chorus creates a din that can be heard kilometres away. But how do inland frogs survive Australia’s hot dry summers when running water can all but disappear?

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    Science in action - monitoring the Gwydir River system

    Science played an important role in re-starting the Gwydir and Mehi rivers after a dry spell. In the Gwydir valley, the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage helped to protect native fish and gently restore flows to local waterways.

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    Working together to support native fish

    The science behind water management is helping to provide healthy habitat capable of sustaining native fish throughout their lifetime. Environmental water is a key component of this process with promising outcomes in Murrumbidgee rivers and wetlands.

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    Tracking a feathery tale - feather mapping

    The humble feather has a story to tell and staff from the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage are helping to tell it. A new research project aims to build a ‘feather map’ to track waterbird movement around Australia. And they need your help!

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    Coastal Connections

    The Coastal Connections project is working with community groups, Indigenous trainees and private land managers to protect and restore coastal, estuarine and wetland habitat.

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    Hopkins Wetlands

    The Glenelg Hopkins catchment has more than 5,400 wetlands, covering 73,000 ha or three per cent of the region’s area. This represents 14 per cent of Victoria’s total area of wetlands and 44 per cent of the state’s total number of wetlands.